Hip- Hop’s Art.

"Hip-Hop's Art".

rap lyrics got my head nodding away….

My Kodak snaps, graffiti shows on the digital display…

I wasn’t listening to Outkast, or Dre…

nope, today I’m on that fresh wave, new rappers play…

some Lupe, some Wale, Some Jean Grae.

hot singles from J. Cole,

and Jay Electronica spits cold

…Curren$y and Whiz influenced the music biz…

Pac Div, Nipsey, and Dom Kennedy…

Kid Cudi, Cool kids, Kidz in the Hall…

way down South there is Little Brother ,up North there is Big Sean.

……….and all you hear is Drake when the radio is on.

this is what the kids are listening to…

the internet gives it to you…

I thought it was ridiculous too: skinny jeans and retro shoes…

emo raps and auto-tunes..

But I’m glad the industry grew.

Something new.

innovation.

I’ve been listening to Snoop, Jay-Z, and Lil Wayne for the past decade…

this wave came out of the blue…

this wave came bringing something new…

most importantly, this wave is made for the internet surfer in you.

downloads do what bootlegs used to do.

youtube is the music channel “The Box”.

twitter is word on the block,

The web site for all hip-hop is 1980’s, South Bronx.

blogs lay the laws.

links have their flaws…

and when the internets down…  everything comes to a pause.

It is a big game, it is Saw.

a lot of egos.. a lot of salt…

record sales are at a loss

it takes time to change people’s views and thoughts…

I just ask that Hip-Hop changes with society, but don’t change the art.

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“Uncle Ricky: can you tell me a bedtime story pleeease!!!”

3:34 am.My head is currently nodding in affirmation as I stare at my speakers. The lyrics were like sketch flip books: the animations ran through my imigaintion and I was engulfed…

teacher reads Easy-E lyrics to school children...
teacher reads Eazy-E lyrics to school children...

Recently, I picked up the book ” The Story Factor” by Annette Simmons. I perused the first 10 pages of the book, and took note on Simmons’ method of influence. The author say, lectures, and long winded speeches do nothing for most people, while a good story will pull most listeners to find the answers themselves, thus engaging and captivating the audience:

“We spend too much time talking to a person’s rational brain and we neglect their emotional brain…”.

It wasn’t the concept that blew my barn doors open and got me to thinking; it was the real life application.

For instance, If I tell you,  “don’t go down a dark street- it’s not safe.”, you might listen to me- but you will not be moved. But if I tell you, “about three weeks ago a kid that looks just like you was abducted on that dark street…”. I have tapped into your emotions, and now you have not only listened, but you have been moved. Even more so, I have not advised you to do anything, instead, I have given you enough information to make your own life decisions.

This is a relatively simple concept. We see it all the time in society. But the one place this concept is most readily seen in my life-isn’t seen at all:It’s heard.

Hip-hop has expanded my vocabulary, has given me rhythmic inclination ( I can dance… on beat), and now I realize, Hip-hop has given me some of the greatest examples of telling stories. Stories that influence, stories that move, stories that cause you to stare at the speaker and nod in affirmation as if the emcee was speaking to you… and these are just a few:

First off, if you know nothing about storytelling in hip-hop ,you need not go further than a man by the name of Slick Rick “the Ruler”. His long list of classic albums include hits like “Mona Lisa” and “Young World”, but the story that reigns supreme in hip-hop, is a track by the famed eye-patch sporting-British Emcee called,  “Children’s story“.

On the heels of Slick Rick’s first mention, it is only right to chase that drink with a second helping of Slick Rick. This time, it’s via a collaboration with the ATLien duo, known as Outkast on the track  “The art of Story Telling“. Outkast f. Slick Rick.

Two of the top rappers in the game, Nas and Jay- Z also have a couple of stories that standout to me as lyrical illustrations of real life situations.

Jay-Z’s ” Meet the Parents” is something like a hip-hop Shakespearian Drama:

while Nas’ “Rewind” is like watching a VHS backwards- right before you take it back to Blockbuster…

On the West coast…there are two or three tracks that are stories that I hold near and dear…

first is the track”Northern California” by San Quinn, which is a story about how the Bay Area came to its current position within the Rap game.

…and then there is a story by East Oakland’s own Yukmouth (1/2 of the Luniz- who made the song “I got 5 on it”), the track is titled ” City of Dope”  and gives an explicit account of the history of the streets of East Oakland as seen through a young man’s eyes, while coming of age in the crack-cocaine era.

Speaking of coming of age, the song “Southside” by Scarface,  was one of my favorite tracks growing up. In my teen years, you couldn’t imagine how often I used the line: “spent my day right off of (28th) broke and disgusted/ not a dollar to buy food/ but i’m smoking…so fuck it.”… ( I’d change the block Scarface references to  the block we hung out on.)

Speaking of smoking, and hanging out with the boys, and a classic lines in story rhymes… I give you Christopher Wallace’s contribution:  “Call my niggas on the cell/ bring some weed, I’ve got a story to tell”.

Notorius BIG ” I gotta Story to Tell

I noticed… many of my the story songs take a dark tone; they speak about death and portrayal, they speak of crime and sin. And I couldn’t end on that note…So, before this train of thought pulls into the station, I’d like to play one uplifting story: “Today was a Good Day”- Ice Cube.

alright, that’s the end of the story hour for now…yall go make like Ice Cube and have a good day… oh, and keep this in mind:

…Let us lead a life so that we have a story to tell at the end, a story that moves people. a story that influences people. and not just another story that people listen to…

Check 1-2, 1-2…Dear Hip-Hop, These 12 songs are 4 You!

Snoop Dogg and Jay-Z recently came together to make yet another classic Hip-Hop track titled “I wanna Rock” (remix). Jay-Z’s entire verse is an ode to some of the influences in the rap game. It got me to thinking: what are other songs that are Ode’s to Hip-Hop/ music that I have to make note of….here’s the list:

(**there are two or three songs that the lovely people at youtube.com decided to make “Embedding disabled by request”…therefore you might have to click the link and watch them on youtube instead of this blog- thanks capitalism, you’ve done wonders for Hip-Hop)

To kick things off, I’d like to call on Erykah Badu, who is arguably the nicest female Emcee in history, but happens to be defined as an R&B/ neo-soul artist. I love this video, as it depicts Hip-Hop’s entire time line. From the block with donkey ropes and Addidas to the current world of corporate Hip-Hop, where white audiences reign supreme. The video is full of cameos: MC Lyte, Kool Herc, Chuck D, Common, and the legendary b-boy breaker Crazy Legs…check 1-2-1-2..check it out.

And while we’re on the topic of Badu, you gotta throw this one in there Erykah Badu’s “The Healer”…just because she dedicates it to J. Dilla, the late great producer…and she says “Hip-Hop…its bigger than the government.” And it is.

R.I.P Dilla

This next 1, might have flown under a couple of folks radars…but this is special to me: I used to this on repeat when I was about 10 or 11 years old…and at that time, you had to listen to the whole song, and rewind the tape in order to listen to it agian.

R.I.P. Freeky Tah

Eric Sermon’s “Just Like Music” This is a refreshing track, made by a legendary emcee and is a great example of the power of sample; using the legendary soul singer Marvin Gaye’s vocals.

R.I.P. Marvin Gaye

Afrika Bambaataa’s track…it’s a prerequisite to breing a hip-hop head… you don’t know this. Hip-Hop Don’t know you!

Dead Prez’s Hip-Hop…this is the power of Hip-Hop in terms of revolt against media control. This is motivation music; when this song comes on in my headphones, I have to hold myself back from doing push-ups…cause doing push-ups on the metro train is a little too gangsta for the majority of society.

Speaking of gangsta, you can’t more gangsta than NWA.The group’s resurgence in the late 90’s brought about this track…it wasn’t an ode to hip-hop as much it was “chin-check” of the so-called gangsta rappers of the day. Just a lil something to say “Hello”, and let the word know who started this Gansta shit: West side!!!

R.I.P. Easy- E.

Keeping it in the hood… One of my favorite’s and probably one of the most underated tracks in the history of Ode’s to Hip-Hop, not only was this song slept on by many, but I even slept on the video was looked over too! with appearances from Bun-B, Devin the Dude, and Scarface; Cleveland artist Ray Cash’s “Bumpin my Music” had to make the list…

Since we’re in the South now, we have to mention Outkast. They are the greatest Hip-Hop duo in the history of mankind. period. And with their artistry combined with Slick Rick’s aura, the song “art of story telling” is an ode to Hip-Hop’s basic purpose… a way for people without a voice to rhythmically tell their own story.

With the amount of life the last artists have put into the game, its hard to imagine Hip-Hop ever needing a tombstone…But Queens emcee Nasir Jones begged to differ. Nas’ “Hip-Hop is Dead” wasn’t an ode to Hip-Hop, it was more of an obituary… But it has it’s place on the list, for: if you love something, you should forever be critical of it.

Seemingly in response to Nas’ claim that Hip-Hop had met its death date, a slew of young artist popped up with lyrical insight and a breath of new life into Hip-Hop. One of the most notable new artist on the scene is kid from Chicago by the name of Lupe. This track is not only a dedication to slain rapper from New Orleans, Soldier Slim, but a dedication to many young men and women who find life in beat breaks, fresh hooks, and clever punch-lines.

Lupe Fiasco’s “Hip- Hop save my life.”

And last but not least… the all time classic: Naughty By Nature’s “Hip Hop Horay”…the original dedication to Hip-Hop.

Hope yall enjoyed this… R.I.P. to BIG and 2PAC, a number of other artist…And in the words of Eric B. and Rakim:

“what happened to peace?…oh yeah: PEACE!”

6 East Coast Rap Songs 4 the Hard Times

 

East Coast Rap

East Coast rap is the most graphic musical example of “the struggle” of Black America since the invention of the Blues. period.

Here is a short list of some of the songs I let rock during the hard times…

Ghostface Killah’s “All That I got is You”

classic line:  “check it: 15 of us in a 3 bedroom apartment/ roaches everywhere/ cousins and aunts was there/ 2 at the foot, 2 at the head/I didn’t like to sleep with Jon-Jon/ he peed in bed.”

KRS-1’s “Love’s Gonna get’cha”

classic line: “I got 3 pairs of pants, and with brother I share/ so there in school- Im made a fool: with 1 1/2 pairs of pants you ain’t cool!”

Jay-Z’s “Anything”

Classic Line: “from the stoop, to the big dudes stopping us from playing hoops/ and us getting mad, throwing rocks off the roof”

Freeway’s  “what we do”

classic line: “if my heat stop working/ then my heat start working/…IMMA ROB ME A PERSON!”

Notorius B.I.G.’s “Everyday Struggle”

classic line: “I know how it feels to wake up fucked up/ Pockets broke as hell, another rock to sell/ People look at you like you’re the user /Selling drugs to all the losers mad Buddha abuser.”

DMX’s “Slippin”

Classic line(S): *This is one of my top 5 favorite songs of all time, therefore its hard for me to choose just a couple of lyrics- this whole song is exemplifies inner city juvenile struggle to a tee…but if there are any lines that stand out, these two would be them:

“I’m ready for the world or at least I thought I was/ Baggin’ niggas when I caught a buzz/ For thinking about how short I was”

” Sayin’ to myself that could’ve been yo ass on the TV/ Believe me it could be done something’s got to give/ It’s got to change cause I’ve got a son/ I’ve got to do the right thing for shorty/ And that means no more getting high drinking forties”

Baa-Ram-Ewe Jay-Z, Baa-Ram-Ewe!

…Since we are on the topic of Images in the mass media and how the effect the greater society: let us discuss secret societies.

Shawn Cater, also known as the Brooklyn born rapper who dawns the stage name of Jay-Z, has a following that is unmatched by most contemporary rappers. His track record speaks for itself, and gives credence to his claim that he is “the best rapper alive”. But with all the praise that “Hova” (another one of his aliases) receives from his fans, supporters, and above all- consumers, it doesn’t stop eye-brow raising and the subsequent questions as to what is going on in Jay-Z’s imagination? And what are the meanings behind the latest images his videos are generating?

His newest video “On to the Next One”, is the latest successful hit from arguably the most successful rapper to ever do it. But something about this video didn’t sit right with the blog world, the real world, and has people in an uproar wondering about the symbols from the underworld.

This is video in raw form…

 

Jay-Z’s mysterious affiliation/ affinity for secret societies has been the topic of conversations in barbershops to business offices and back to the block, but the one question the easily entertained world is wondering: what does it all mean?

So much so, that this video was produced in effort to break down the symbolism present in his videos. Watch closely…

I find it fascinating that people are scared to speak on “the dark side”;If you shine light where there is darkness, there will no longer be darkness.

Ironically, Illuminati by definition means “the enlightened ones”. 

I found this video, where a gentleman by the name of Michael Tsarion sheds some sort of light on the symbolism in the media…

In watching this video and listening to Jay-Z’s lyrics “On To The Next One”, there are commonalities: the alcohol, the entertainment, the constant consumption of things that will bring about immediate satisfaction. These  things that will only matter until we again chose to move onto “the next one”. So when will we find “the one.”

This is how illusions in society  will steer you from true forms of fulfillment in life.

With fear that this conversation is lacking depth, I think I have the perfect way to summarize my point. Now, don’t get me misconstrued,  tangled, or twitsted, I’m not a fan of Swine or enforcers of the laws of which we (sometimes) abide by… But man, a pig has never spoken truer words:

Baaram-ewe, baaram-ewe. To your breed, your fleece, your clan be true. Sheep be true. Baaram-ewe.”-Babe

We are all sheep in way or another, but it is a matter of staying true to yourself in the midst of all this media consumption, in the midst of society, and in the midst of the unknown…know yourself: sheep be true.