“One Good Thing About Music, When it Hits You Feel No Pain”- Bob Marley/ not Drake…Never Drake

Fuck Drake… yeah I said it, catchy bastard…and Fuck Lady Gaga while your at it…Damn pop music has been polluting my mind too long!!! I’ve got to get to the bottom of this…

I hopped off my six hour cross-country flight, and sat at the baggage claim terminal with the patience of a wile fisherman. I was fishing for my bags. But my angelic poise and focus was disturbed by a manic voice in my head. It was the voice of Drake …and all it was saying: “one good thing about music/ when it hits you feel no pain”,  a line from the song “Over”.

I had to get away from my mind’s lyrical repetition. I grabbed my headphones. Activated the pandora application on my blackberry. and let the Bob Marley station take me away from the world of Drake-dom.

…”One good thing about music, when it hits you feel no pain” sung the Trenchtown legend named Robert Marley.

The first song that pandora played was Bob Marley’s “Hit Me With Music

My jaw dropped. retrieving my bags wasn’t nearly the object of my mission anymore. It was deeper than some luggage. This was about “one good thing about music”…or rather, the “one bad thing about music…when it hits- it gets stuck in yo brain!”, and I was tired of it.

I eventually made it home. I kissed my mom for Mother’s Day. I punched my nephew for his Birthday. And I even saw this pretty young lady from Berkeley smile- that made my day. But I wasn’t content. not nearly. I popped up in the middle of the night and began an internet inquiry in effort to get to the root of this issue.

this should be considered business malpractice.

When you start digging up dirt, you will find worms. In this case, I found “earworms”. An article on Howstuffworks.com informed me that,  “(earworms) are parasitic in the sense that they get lodged in your head and cause a sort of “cognitive itch” or “brain itch” — a need for the brain to fill in the gaps in a song’s rhythm”. The site continued to say that, it is a function of your auditory cortex to naturally want to fill in the gaps missing in auditory patterns. The auditory cortex does the repetitions in effort to complete the pattern that was once heard.

The cycles of catchy tunes serves as the perfect pattern to spark the auditory cortex; all that’s saying is: “listening to music will casue music to get stuck in your head”…uhhhh….duuuh! The question is, once a song is stuck in your head, how do you get that DJ to stop the record?

The article suggests listening to another song, or listening to the same song again (to complete the pattern), or even go as far as imaging the “earworm” as a real thing- and then picture it crawling out of your head. (and these are paid scientists???)

I can remember being young, sitting at a bus stop, and a passing car’s soundtrack would be blasting down the street; as the car passed, my mind would be indoctrinated. I noticed this pattern at a young age, I’ve always had a thing for noticing patterns. So when the article on earworms suggested that music being stuck in your head is nothing more than your brain trying to form a pattern, I can believe it. I like patterns. I excelled in elementary school! And I look good in plaid, at least the girl from Berkeley with the pretty smile thinks so.

In the end: the pattern of getting music stuck in my head must go! Before the summer “pop hit” comes out, I need to find a way to rid myself of this patttern!

But until I do… I’ll sit here, in a state of misery, with Lady Gaga’s  quote “my phone vibrrrrating”, from the song “Telephone” playing over and over and over in my head.

I’m not a big Drake fan, and not nearly a member of the Lady Gaga fan club; but I figure the only thing worse than you getting a song stuck in your head- is when someone else causes it to happen… So I decided to share that song with yall…songs cool, but the video is epic!

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